AMA: how to cope as a solo tester

Bodda asks…

hey, i like your blog, i’m reading your blog on a daily basis, and i just want to ask you what i can i do to enhance my skills, knowledge and to be a be good in functional testing (manual and automation) IF i’m the ONLY tester in my current company (performing all testing activities), but i feel that i have a mess in my head and lots to learn to be up to date with the last trends.
my question now “What to learn, When(everyday?) and How in case your are the only tester in your company”.

i hope to answer my question soon to make my head calm down

My response…

I have fond memories of a project where I worked as the solo tester on a software delivery team; we had something like 8 developers (including one lead who took on iteration management tasks) and me as a tester. That was it. I loved it because we established really good unhindered rapport with our business stakeholders, and I was always busy!

But getting back to your question: when I was working in that situation it was vital that we had developers working on as much test automation as possible, alongside functional development, since there was just too much functional testing to do for a single person also doing test automation. I found myself spending about 80% of my time just testing new functionality and spot-testing different browsers/devices etc. The remaining 20% I spent ensuring we had good regression test coverage through the automated tests that developers were writing and I was helping maintain. So first and foremost I would strongly encourage you to get the developers you work with to have as much responsibility as possible for automated tests.

If you have this in place you should be able to take a deep breath and spend more time doing quality testing. I have found the best way to learn is on the job, you’ll be in a good position to do this, and often you’ll learn best by making your own mistakes.

learning - 1
via The New Yorker

If you want to know more about how to become better at what you do, I’ve shared some tips in a previous answer. There’s also my Pride & Paradev book which I wrote whilst working as a solo tester on a team.

All the best.

Notes from the 2015 ANZTB Conference in Auckland

I was lucky enough to make my first trans-Tasman journey to Auckland last week to attend the 2015 ANZTB Conference. The conference was enjoyable and there were some memorable talks I really enjoyed (I personally like single-stream events). Here’s some favorites:

Secure by Design – Laura Bell – slides

I loved the essence of this talk which was basically (in my own words) ‘take security testing off the pedestal’. Laura shared five simple tools and techniques to make security more accessible for developers and testers alike. One key takeaway for me was to focus on getting the language right: ‘security vulnerabilities hide behind acronyms, jargon and assumptions‘. For example, most people understand the different between authentication (providing identity) and authorization (access rights), but both these terms are commonly shortened to ‘auth’ which most people use interchangeably (and confusingly). A great talk.

Innovation through Collaboration – Wil McLellan

This was probably my favorite talk of the day, as it was a well told story about building a collaborative co-working space called ‘EPIC’ for IT start-ups in Christchurch following the 2011 earth quake. The theme was how collaboration encourages innovation, and even companies in competition benefit through collaboration. My key takeaway was how designing a space you can encourage collaboration, for example, in EPIC there’s only a single kitchen for the whole building, and each tenancy doesn’t has it’s own water. So, if someone wants a drink or something to eat they need to visit a communal area. Doing this enough times means you start interacting with others in the building you wouldn’t normally do so in your day to day work.

Through a different lens – Sarah Pulis – slides

Sarah is the Head of Accessibility Services at PwC in Sydney and she shared some good background information about why accessibility is important and some of the key resources to analyse/evaluate and improve accessibility of systems. Whilst I knew most of the resources she mentioned, I thought here talk was very well put together.

Well done to the team that organized the conference.

Auckland was a beautiful city BTW, here’s a couple of pics I took:

Test your web apps in production? Stylebot can help.

I test in production way too much for my liking (more details in an upcoming blog post).

testinprod

Testing in production is risky, especially because I test in a lot of different environments and they all look the same. I found the only way I could tell which environment I was in was by looking closely at the URL. This was problematic as it led to doing things in a production environment thinking I was using a pre-production or test environment – oops.

I initially thought about putting some environment specific code/CSS into our apps that made the background colour different for each environment, but the solution was complex and it still couldn’t tell me I was using production from a glance.

I recently found the Stylebot extension for Chrome that allows you to locally tweak styles on any websites you visit. I loaded this extension and added our production sites with the background colour set to bright red, so now I immediately know I am using production as it’s bright red, be extra careful.

Stylebot Example

I’ve also set some other environments to be contrasting bright colours (purple, yellow etc.) so I am know from a quick glance what environment I am using.

I like this solution as I haven’t had to change any of our apps at all and it works in all environments: which is just what I needed.

Do you do something similar? Leave a comment below.