AMA: JavaScript in Test Automation

Max asks…

First of all thanks for sharing all your insights on this blog. I regularly try to come back to your blog and I helped me grow as a QA Engineer quite a lot.
I wanted to ask you on your opinion on a seemingly new generation of test tools for the web that are written in JavaScript to help deal with all the asynchronicity on modern front end frameworks. Our company is in the process of redesigning our website and it seems that it just gets harder and harder to deal with all the JavaScript in test automation. I recently started looking into some other tool like, but as of now they still seem quite immature.
Could you help me and point me in the right direction?

My response…

I think there’s two parts to the JavaScript asynchronicity issue which are not necessarily related.

Modern JavaScript front-end web frameworks (like React and Angular) are designed to be asynchronous and fast and therefore this can cause issues when trying to write automated tests against them. I don’t believe writing automated tests in an asynchronous way actually makes the tests easier to write, or more maintainable or robust, but just a result of writing these tests in the same way the web frameworks work.

You can write synchronous tests (like using Watir/Ruby) against asynchronous web interfaces, you just need to use the waiting/polling mechanisms (or write/extend your own) – the same as you need to do in asynchronous test automation tools.

We choose WebDriverJS for automated end-to-end testing of our React application as it was the official WebDriver for JavaScript project and seems to be a good choice at the time. I somewhat regret that decision now as using a synchronous third party implementation like seems like an easier way to write and maintain tests.

I have tried to use but the way it controls sites (through proxies) has (current) limitations like not working on iFrames and cross-domains which are deal-breakers for our end-to-end testing needs at present.

If you don’t need to write your end-to-end tests in JavaScript I’d say avoid it unless absolutely necessary and stick to another non-asynchronous programming language.

I’m glad I’ve been able to help you grow over the years.

Puppeteer for Automated e2e Chrome Testing in Node

I recently noticed the new Google Chrome project Puppeteer:

Puppeteer is a Node library which provides a high-level API to control headless Chrome or Chromium over the DevTools Protocol. It can also be configured to use full (non-headless) Chrome or Chromium.

As someone who only runs WebDriver tests in Google Chrome anyway, this looks like a promising project that bypasses WebDriver to have full programmatic control of Google Chrome including for automated end-to-end (e2e) tests.

The thing I really love about this is no Chromedriver dependency and how installing the library installs Chromium by default which can be controlled headlessly with zero config or any other dependencies.

You can even develop scripts using this playground.

I set up a (very basic) demo project that uses Mocha + Puppeteer and it runs on CircleCI with zero config. Awesome.

AMA: Moving automated tests from Java to JavaScript

Anonymous asks…

I am currently using a BDD framework with Cucumber, Selenium and Java for automating a web application. I used page factory to store the objects and using them in java methods I wanted to replace the java piece of code with javaScript like mocha or webdriverio. could you share your thoughts on this? can I still use page factory to maintain objects and use them in js files

My response…

What’s the reasoning for moving to JavaScript from Java? Despite having common names, there’s very little otherwise in common (Car is to Carpet as Java is to JavaScript.)

I wouldn’t move for moving sake since I see no benefit in writing BDD style web tests in JavaScript, if anything, e2e automated tests are much harder to write in JavaScript/Node because everything is asynchronous and so you have to deal with promises etc. which is much harder to do than just using Java (or Ruby).

Aside: I still dream of writing e2e tests in Ruby: it’s just so pleasant. But our new user interface is written extensively in JavaScript (React) so it makes sense from a sustainability point of view to use JS over Ruby.


Minesweepers Anonymous

Once upon a time there lived a couple who loved playing massively multiplayer online role-playing video games with each other (World of Warcraft or Destiny or something). The thing about these games is that they’re a bit like exercise/fitness where you need to keep playing them to keep your score high, and if you don’t you play them (or exercise) enough your score (or fitness) starts dropping which makes it much less fun overall.

So playing these games all went well for the couple, for a while.

Continue reading “Minesweepers Anonymous”

Handling JavaScript alerts when leaving a page with WebDriver

You’ve most probably seen the sometimes-useful-but-often-annoying browser alerts when navigating away from a page:JavaScript onbeforeunload alert

How do we deal with these using WebDriver?

Continue reading “Handling JavaScript alerts when leaving a page with WebDriver”