ATTAC 2019: Australian Test & Tech Automation Conference

I’m excited to be presenting at this year’s ATTAC (Australian Test & Tech Automation Conference) in Melbourne on 24th May on establishing automated e2e web testing in Node.js:

Node.js is so hot right now. Whether you’re looking at quality engineering jobs at a new and upcoming startup, or at an established corporate, chances are you’ll see Node.js on the tech stack. But establishing automated e2e web testing in Node.js is hard since it’s very different to traditional web automation technology. In this talk Alister will use nearly four years of Node.js experience to bring clarity to the somewhat confusing Node.js landscape, going into detail on things like asynchronous promises, ECMAScript transpiling, npm vs yarn and monorepos.

Adventures of end-to-end automated web testing in Node.js #

I attended the first conference last year in Melbourne and loved the format (single day, single track), affordability (tickets from AUD$199) and technical subject matter.

Early bird tickets are on sale now. I hope to see you there!

TestBash Sydney: Automated e2e Testing at WordPress.com

This is an approximate transcript of the talk I delivered at TestBash in Sydney on Friday 19th October 2018.

Alister Scott Test Bash Sydney Oct 2018-1-1

Today I’d like to share my story about how we started with automated end to end testing at WordPress.com since I started at Automattic over 3 years ago.

Alister Scott Test Bash Sydney Oct 2018 2-2

Continue reading “TestBash Sydney: Automated e2e Testing at WordPress.com”

Testbash Australia 2018

I only speak at one conference a year and this year that conference will be the first ever Australian Testbash in Sydney on October 19, 2018:

TestBash_Australia_2018_Adverts_DOJO_EVENT_BANNER.png

My talk:

At WordPress.com we constantly deliver changes to our millions of customers – in the past month alone we released our React web client 563 times; over 18 releases every day. We don’t conduct any manual regression testing, and we only employ 5 software testers in a company of ~680 people with ~230 developers across . So, how do we ensure our customers get a consistently great user experience with all this rapid change?

Our automated end-to-end (e2e) tests give us confidence to release small frequent changes constantly to all our different applications and platforms knowing that our customers can continue to use our products to achieve their desires.

Alister will share how these automated tests are written and work, some of the benefits and challenges we’ve seen in implementing these tests, and what we have planned for future iterations.

Takeaways: How to effectively use automated end-to-end testing to ensure a consistent user experience in high frequency delivery environments

Grab a ticket before they sell out #

Staying focused with one conference presentation per year

I recently saw Basecamp made their employee handbook available online1 and this statement stood out to me in their moonlighting guide:

Not OK

2. Go out on a regular speaking circuit tour which is going to require multiple days of travel multiple times a year. That’s too disruptive to our own work schedule and to your fellow teammates.

For this exact reason, without knowing, I created my own personal rule2 of only committing to doing one conference presentation per year.

Continue reading “Staying focused with one conference presentation per year”

AMA: Any more talks planned?

Anonymous asks..

I learned who you were by watching your Google automation talk last year in 2015. Your presentations are really nice. Are you planning on giving any other presentations this year or next year?

My response…

My short answer is no.

My long answer is also no because I actually don’t actually enjoy giving presentations at all. I wrote about my battles with anxiety last year and whilst I am 90% better than I was, last year I committed to present three talks in less than two months which resulted in me having panic attacks about giving these talks. This wasn’t fair on my wife or children who I need to support on a day-to-day basis.

Each talk requires a huge amount of preparation and since my personality leans towards perfectionism I wanted to make sure each talk was as good as it could be, so I wrote every word of each talk and (unsuccessfully) tried to memorise these. This resulted in me delivering the talks partly reading what I’d prepared, which I wasn’t happy about as I was comparing myself to others who delivered their talks without notes.

The reason people give talks is that speech is an amazingly effective communications tool – probably the most so – yet it’s a drastically inefficient communications tool – each minute of a talk requires at least an hour of preparation. I much prefer written communication as I find confidence in writing, and I hope with frequent, thoughtful updates to my blog I can reach a wide audience and still be effective in spreading new ideas.