Is test management wrong?

I was somewhat confused by what was meant by the recent article entitled “Test Management is Wrong“. I couldn’t quite work out whether the author meant Test Management (the activity) is wrong, Test Managers (the people) are wrong or Test Management Tools (the things) are wrong, but here’s my view of these three things:

Test Management (the activity): now embedded in agile teams;
Test Managers (the people): on the way out; and
Test Management Tools (the things): gathering dust

Let me explain with an example. Most organizations see the benefit of agile ‘iterative’ development and have or are in the process of restructuring teams to work in this way. A typical transformation looks like this:

Agile Transformation

Instead of having three separate larger ‘analysis’, ‘development’ and ‘test’ teams, the organization may move to four smaller cross functional teams consisting of say one tech lead, one analyst, one tester and four programmers.

Previously a test manager managed the testing process (and testing team) probably using a test management tool such as Quality Centre.

Now, each agile team is responsible for its own quality, the tester advocates quality and encourages activities that build quality in such as accurate acceptance criteria, unit testing, automated acceptance testing, story testing and exploratory testing. These activities aren’t managed in a test management tool, but against each user story in a lightweight story management tool (such as Trello). The tester is responsible for managing his/her own testing.

Business value is defined and measured an iteration at a time by the team.

So what happens to the Analysis, Development and Test Managers in the previous structure? Depending on the size of the organization, there may be a need for a ‘center of excellent’ or ‘community practice’ in each of the areas to ensure that new ideas and approaches are seeded across the cross-functional teams. The Test Manager may be responsible for working with each tester in the teams to ensure this happens. But depending on the organization and the testers, this might not be needed. This is the same for the Analysis Manager, and to a lesser extent, the Development Manager.

Step by Step test cases (such as those in Quality Center) are no longer needed as each user story has acceptance criteria, and each team writes automated acceptance tests written for functionality they develop which acts as both automated regression tests and living documentation.

So the answer the author’s original message: no I don’t think test management is wrong, we just do it in a different way now.

Long live the analyst-programmer

“Getting things done means doing things you might not be interested in. No matter how sexy a project is, there are always boring tasks. Tedious tasks. Tasks that a less mature engineer may deem beneath their dignity or their job title.”

~ John Allspaw

Once upon a time, before we called ourselves agile, there lived a role called an analyst-programmer. The analyst-programmer was a generalist before generalists became cool: just as content to analyze a requirement as to write some code and implement it.

Along came agile software development and its disturbing trend towards having senior developers that are above anything but pure coding. Writing SQL scripts for reference data, analyzing what is actually required, configuring a CI build: these are all tedious tasks that take away from what the senior developer is supposedly entitled to do: just write code to meet explicit acceptance criteria. The senior developer expects a flock of paradevs to run around doing their analysis, writing their acceptance criteria, and finally testing the code that they write. Some even expect the paradev to read the acceptance criteria aloud to them, because reading themselves isn’t coding.

You’ll start to notice who these senior developers are when you hear them say things like “I get paid too much to do this”, or “why are you wasting my time having me do this?”.

One day I imagine a world where all software development roles are suitably generalist and humble, that instead of complaining that “I’m too good for this”, people in these roles simply get their hands dirty and get things done.