Now, Next, Later, Never (improving MoSCoW)

Our team sets quarterly objectives, which we break down into requirements spread across fortnightly sprints. As the paradev on my team I work closely with our product owner to write and prioritise these requirements.

We originally started using the MoSCoW method to prioritize our requirements:

The term MoSCoW itself is an acronym derived from the first letter of each of four prioritization categories (Must have, Should have, Could have, and Won’t have

Wikipedia

We quickly started noticing that the terminology (Must have, Should have, Could have, Won’t have) didn’t really work well in our context and how we were thinking, and this caused a lot of friction in how we were prioritizing, and adoption by the team. It didn’t feel natural to classify things as must, should, could, won’t as it didn’t directly correlate into what we should be working on.

Over a few sessions we came up with our own groupings for our requirements based upon when we would like to see them in our product: Now, Next, Later, Never. We’ve continued to use these four terms and we’ve found they have been very well adopted by the team as it’s very natural for us to think in these groupings.

The biggest benefit of using Now, Next, Later, Never is they naturally translate into our product roadmap and sprint planning.

I did some research in writing this post and found Now, Next, Later as a thing from ThoughtWorks back in 2012, but I couldn’t find any links that included the Never grouping as well which we’ve found very useful to call out what we agree that we won’t be doing.

How do you go about prioritizing your requirements?

Author: Alister Scott

Alister is a Software Quality Engineer from Brisbane, Australia.

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