AMA: exciting technologies on my radar

Mark asks…

What’s the most exciting technology or methodology that is on your radar in the QA space?

My response…

There’s a few things I’m currently excited about in the QA space:

Live Branches: As we move towards testing and deploying small incremental changes done via frequent pull requests, I have found the missing piece of this pie is having a live environment per pull request, where you can access and test new functionality with ease. This would complete the feedback loop for experimentation via branches/pull requests: send someone a link to your live branch for quick feedback. We’re nine-tenths of the way there with live branches for pull requests: I will write a more detailed blog post about these when live branches are finally live.

Real-time JavaScript Error Monitoring: As we continue to move towards full JavaScript single page apps (built with React etc.) the more important it becomes to verify that we don’t have JavaScript console errors in various browsers. We can’t test everything everywhere before deploy so I am excited by tools/services like Sentry that allow you to monitor JavaScript errors being thrown from user’s browsers in Production in real time.

Testing Chat as an Interface: with the rise of chat as an interface (eg. ordering pizza via Facebook Messenger) it raises some testing concerns: firstly how do we test the endless variety of input, and even then, how do we know what users will actually ask? It’s like a combination of testing command line applications and artificial intelligence, and you only really know what people will do after it goes live.


Author: Alister Scott

Alister is an Excellence Wrangler for Automattic.

4 thoughts on “AMA: exciting technologies on my radar”

  1. For the “Real-time JavaScript Error Monitoring”, did your team/organization consider an in-house solution as well? I know my previous employer had a team that was looking into that, don’t know if they ever moved forward with it. The premise of the solution would be to catch the errors with special handlers in the client side application code that would route an AJAX request back to the organization’s servers to log the error. My current employer is actually employing this technique in-house. I don’t know the details of the implementation though, but we can look/search through those error logs with ELK.

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