Waterfall, Agile Development & Hyperbole

Hyperbole. Love it or hate it, it’s been around for centuries and is here to stay. And, as someone pointed out this week, I’m guilty as charged of using (abusing?) it on this blog. You just need to quickly flick through my recent posts to find such melodramatic titles such as ‘Do you REALLY need to run your WebDriver tests in IE?‘, ‘UI automation of vendor delivered products always leads to trouble‘, and  ‘Five signs you’re not agile; you’re actually mini-waterfall‘. Hyperbole supports my motto for this blog and my life: strong opinions, weakly held.

But it’s not just me who likes hyperbole mixed into their blog posts. Only this morning did I read the catchy titled ‘Waterfall Is Never the Right Approach‘ followed quickly with a similarly catchy titled rebuttal: ‘Why waterfall kicks ass‘ (I personally would have capitalized ‘NEVER’ and ‘ASS’).

While I found both of articles interesting, I think they both missed the key difference between waterfall and agile software development (and why waterfall rarely works in these fickle times): waterfall is sequential whereas agile development is (at least meant to be) iterative.

I personally don’t care whether you do SCRUM or XP, whether you write your requirements in Word™ or on the back of an index card, or even if you stand around in a circle talking about what card you’re working on.

What I do care about is whether you’re delivering business value frequently and adjusting to the feedback you get.

Sequential ‘big bang’ development such as waterfall, by its nature, delivers business value less frequently, and chances are when that value is realized the original problem has changed (depending on how long ago that was), because as I stated and believe, we live in fickle times.

Iterative development addresses this by developing/releasing small fully functional pieces of business value iteratively and adjusting to feedback/circumstance.

Just because an organization practices what they call ‘agile’, doesn’t mean they’re delivering business value iteratively. I’ve seen plenty of ‘agile’ projects deliver business value very non-frequently, they’re putting a sequential process into agile ‘sprints’ followed by a large period of end to end, business and user acceptance testing, with a ‘big bang’ go live.

Whilst I believe iterative development is the best way to work; I’m not dogmatic (enough) to believe it’s the only way to work. Whilst I believe you could build and tests parts of say an aeroplane iteratively, I still hope there’s it’s a sequential process with a whole heap of testing at the end on a fully complete aeroplane before I take my next flight in it.

Author: Alister Scott

Alister is an Excellence Wrangler for Automattic.