Free yourself from your filters

One of the most interesting articles I have read recently was ‘It’s time to engineer some filter failure’ by Jon Udell:

“The problem isn’t information overload, Clay Shirky famously said, it’s filter failure. Lately, though, I’m more worried about filter success. Increasingly my filters are being defined for me by systems that watch my behavior and suggest More Like This. More things to read, people to follow, songs to hear. These filters do a great job of hiding things that are dissimilar and surprising. But that’s the very definition of information! Formally it’s the one thing that’s not like the others, the one that surprises you.”

Our sophisticated community based filters have created echo chambers around the software testing profession.

“An echo chamber is a situation in which information, ideas, or beliefs are amplified or reinforced by transmission and repetition inside an “enclosed” system, often drowning out different or competing views.” ~ Wikipedia

I’ve seen a couple of echo chambers have evolved:

  • The context driven testing echo chamber where the thoughts of a couple of the leaders are amplified and reinforced by the followers (eg. checking isn’t testing)
  • The broader software testing echo chamber where testers define themselves as testers and are only interesting in hearing things from other testers (eg. developers are evil and can’t test)
  • The agile echo chamber where anything agile is good and anything waterfall is bad (eg. if you’re not doing continous delivery you’re not agile)

So how do we break free of these echo chambers we’ve built using our sophisticated filters? We break those filters!

Jon has some great suggestions in his article (eg. dump all your regular news sources and view the world through a different lens for a week) and I have some specific to software testing:

  • attend a user group or meetup that isn’t about software testing – maybe a programming user group or one for business analysts: I attend programming user groups here in Brisbane;
  • learn to program, or manage a project, or write CSS.
  • attend a conference that isn’t about context driven testing: I’m attending two conferences this year, neither are context driven testing conferences (ANZTB Sydney and JSConf Melbourne);
  • follow people on twitter who you don’t agree with;
  • read blogs from people who you don’t agree with or have different approaches;
  • don’t immediately agree (or retweet, or ‘like’) something a ‘leader’ says until you validate it actually makes sense and you agree with it;
  • don’t be afraid to change your mind about something and publicize that you’ve changed your mind; and
  • avoid the ‘daily me‘ apps like the plague.

You’ll soon be able to break yourself free from your filters and start thinking for yourself. Good luck.

Author: Alister Scott

Alister is an Excellence Wrangler for Automattic.

2 thoughts on “Free yourself from your filters”

  1. Cool post, I’m a big advocate of thinking for yourself. I’m a little puzzled as to how my tweet fits into all of it. Can you explain?


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